Stockholm’s renovated National Museum

Stockholm’s National Gallery re-opened in October after a huge renovation supervised by Swedish architects, Gert Wingard and Erik Wikerstal; the gallery had been closed to the public since 2013 and the cost of the refurb was 1.2 billion Swedish crowns around £100 million sterling. I was fond of the old gallery but it was definitely starting to look a little dated and tired around the edges and I was curious to see what had been  done.   I was in Stockholm last month for a weekend visit and popped in.

Wow, what a breath of fresh air!    The sweeping staircase, with the Carl Larsson memorials, leading to the entrance hall, looks much the same but fresher but otherwise what a change.  The ground floor has evolved with the introduction of a new lecture hall and a sculpture garden reminiscent of that at the Louvre (albeit a little smaller); light pours in through the new ceiling comprised of small glass pyramids.

Upstairs, the walls in many of the exhibition rooms are brightly painted with vibrant blues, yellows and reds but this works well set against the elegant whitish greys of the marble columns and the vaulted ceilings.  The hanging is chronological but also thematic- so you have Swedish National Romantic painters in area and Napoleonic art in another.  Furniture and objets d’art art effectively mixed with paintings.

The first floor exhibition space

After or before your museum visit you can relax an exceptionally beautifully designed restaurant with sleek wooden dining tables, exquisite parquet floors and fabulous lighting (10 designers designed glass globes for a splendid chandelier)- a great place to have an open sandwich and a coffee in the morning or a glass of wine in the evening.  

The Atelje restuarant

The museum can now exhibit 5,200 objects around three times as many as they could before the renovation.  It is lighter, more spacious and airy, beautifully designed and is a museum of the twenty first century to compete on a world scale.  I will be back and soon.

Carl Larsson ‘Ett Hem’ watercolours exhibited with furniture of the same period.
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